Be Sure to Complete Safety Steps Before Spring Cooking

Sunday, 19 February 2017 11:45

As the area weather ‘talkers’ begin the invitations to enjoy the possible beginning of spring weather, the Newtown Square Fire Company has issued a safety warning.  Chief Doug Everlof warns that there are simple safety steps for gas-fueled cooking devices

Even thinking about the fuel level, the first of the simple safety steps begins with a simple visual inspection as the cooking system.   This first step provides a look at the flexible tubing, the solid tubes, and any cracks or loose fittings.

Newtown Square’s fire chief has added some protective guidelines.  Everlof stressed, “The first steps in testing this gas-fuel outdoor cooking area begins with a safe testing area and with the protective aid of a cell or home-cordless phone.”

When this fuel delivery system passes the “dry” visual test, the next safety suggestion assures an additional safety test. This next trial must also be done outdoors, away from the home, car, and people.

Chief Everlof added more, “Please continue to stay away from people and property.  Use a soap and water solution (half dish washing soap and half water) and coat all containers, tubes, pipes. valves, and connections that carry the cooking gas.  Finding any bubbles, immediately turn off the gas container valve. . .. and leave that area.”

In a final test, any unusual flame patterns at any of the burners may also be an indication that there may be a partial blockage in the gas-fuel carrying pipes and plumbing.  This pattern is common when insects have used this gas-carrying pipe and tubing for seasonal home. These insects and their home residue must be removed for safe gas cooking

If the removal of the insect remains appears to be difficult, home cooks are reminded of two suggestions.  One hint is to be patient and pursue. If not successful in this task, swallow personal pride and find a specialist to clear the “plumbing” of the insect residue.

Cooking devices must be inspected from time to time to assure no new problems return.  Safety is an important ingredient in all outdoor activities “By paying attention to outdoor cooking tools, the fun of outdoor activities will continue to be a good experience,” added Chief Everlof.

 

Panera Bread Fundraiser - March 15, 2017

Thursday, 16 February 2017 13:50

Please join Newtown Square Fire Company #1 Auxiliary at Panera Bread in Newtown Square Shopping Center March 15, 2017 from 4 to 8 PM.

Panera will donate a portion of the sales during the event to the Newtown Square Fire Co. Auxiliary when you notify the cashier prior to ordering that you are here for the fundraising event.

(Panera gift cards, catering purchases and other retail purchases are excluded from the event.)

Bring a copy of the Eat Bread to Raise Dough flyer, or take a picture of the flyer and present it to the cashier prior to ordering.


 

Even This Short Month Has Dangers

Friday, 03 February 2017 17:18

Rarely does any date have as much impact as February 2.  This date has once more begun a seasonal conversation based upon Punxsutawney Phil’s shadow.  This year, the collection of television and radio weather crews have begun the 2017 discussion about the accuracy of this year’s winter projection.

One of the seasonal events that has a negative impact with a projection of a prolonged collection of cooler temperatures begins with candles and their applications.  Candles have many uses and in their applications, are events associated with emotions and festive events.  Citing an upcoming event Newtown Square Fire Chief Doug Everlof added, “Not far away is the festive February 14, Valentine’s Day.”

The local fire leader quickly added, “Never place any candle or flame anywhere near anything that can burn. This includes anything that burns. These items can include cloth decorations, curtains, or other flammable items or children and their toys.”

Firefighters also stress the importance of have candles burning in homes with pets.  Their tails, fur, and curiosity all become sources of far too many neglected fires started with contact with nearby candles.

Safety is planned and practiced.  This concept was volunteered by Fire Chief Everlof in his February discussion about the seasonal safety suggestions for February. By adding safety to this shortest of 2017’s months, homes and area families are promised the future for the rest of the year.

 

Last Minute Party Drink Items

Thursday, 02 February 2017 14:43

This coming weekend for the season’s end to professional football may pose a problem for many people at a Super Bowl Party.  Some may not be able to partake in any of the traditional party beverages. Medicines, illness, and other temporary preclusions may not permit some attendees from imbibing the usual Super Bowl Party beverages.
Because there may be many reasons that may prompt a collection of differing party beverages, the Newtown Square Fire Company has shared some tasty drinks that in no way will cause any alcoholic responses. Chief Doug Everlof noted that many beverages may also use fruit juice products. He added, “It would be wise to list any fruit juice ingredients so there are no interactions with medicines anyone is currently taking.
As a public service at this active party time of the year, the Newtown Square Fire Company has prepared a long listing of non-alcoholic beverages. The unique tastes and the inviting appearance of these drinks add to their acceptability as an alternative to alcoholic beverages. Not only do they taste great, but they also help ensure the comfort of your guests who may not drink alcohol, or as an alternative throughout the party.
The following are items that will provide multiple servings.
MOCK PINK CHAMPAGNE (1 1/2 quarts or 10 servings)
1/2 cup sugar
1 cup water
1 (6 oz.) can frozen orange juice concentrate
1 (6 oz.) can frozen grapefruit juice concentrate
1 (28 oz.) bottle chilled ginger ale
1/3 cup grenadine syrup
Early in the day, mix sugar with water in saucepan and boil 5 minutes. Cool. Add frozen juice concentrates. Refrigerate. At serving time add ginger ale and grenadine syrup. Stir lightly.
CARDINAL PUNCH (44 servings)
1 qt. cranberry juice
1 pint orange juice
2 lemons squeezed or 2 oz. lemon juice
4 qts. ginger ale
Combine juices with ice and chill. Pour into punch bowl over a block of ice and add ginger ale. Garnish glasses with mint sprig. (May add orange sherbet scoops.)
MOETTE PUNCH (8 servings)
1 cup pineapple juice
1 cup white grape juice
1-pint club soda. Sugar to taste
1-quart raspberry sherbet or ice
Add soda to fruit juices; sweeten to taste. Pour into punch bowl; add scoops of sherbet.
ORANGE CRANBERRY TODDY (8 servings)
2 cups cranberry juice cocktail
1/4 cup sugar
1 Cinnamon Stick
8 whole cloves
6 cups orange juice
2 oranges, sliced
Heat first five ingredients to boiling point. Taste and add more sugar if needed. Garnish with orange slices and add cinnamon sticks for swizzles.
FRUIT SALAD SMOOTHIE
1 cup Tropicana Pure Premium Orange Juice
1 cup plain or vanilla nonfat yogurt, soy milk or tofu
2 kiwi fruit, peeled and cut into chunks
1/2 cup fresh pineapple chunks
1 large banana, cut into chunks
1 cup strawberries, halved
1 tablespoon honey
In blender container, place all ingredients; puree until smooth and creamy. Pour into four glasses and serve garnished with additional whole fruit.
Makes 4 servings.

CREAMY RASPBERRY SIPPER
1 1/4 cups raspberries
1 1/4 cups unsweetened white grape juice
1 1/2 cups raspberry sherbet
1/4 cup water
1 tablespoon lemon juice
10 ice cubes
Fresh mint sprigs, optional
Combine raspberries and grape juice in container of an electric blender; cover and process until smooth, stopping once to scrape down sides. Strain mixture through several layers of dampened cheesecloth, reserving liquid and discarding solids.
Combine reserved liquid, sherbet, water and lemon juice in blender container; cover and process until smooth. Add ice cubes; cover and process until frothy. Serve immediately. Garnish with fresh mint sprigs, if desired.
Yields four 1-cup servings
HOT BUTTERED PINEAPPLE DRINK
1 (48 ounce) can pineapple juice
2/3 cup orange juice
2 tablespoons butter or margarine
2 teaspoons brown sugar
4 (3-inch) sticks cinnamon
Combine all ingredients in a large saucepan; bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer 20 minutes.
Remove cinnamon sticks and serve hot.
Makes 5 cups.
HOT SPICED CIDER
2 quarts cider
2 tablespoons brown sugar
1 teaspoon whole allspice
1 teaspoon whole cloves
1/4 teaspoon salt
Dash of ground nutmeg
Combine cider and spice ingredients. Bring to slow boil, cover, simmer 20 minutes.
Remove from heat and pour through strainer. Add cinnamon stick to each mug.
Makes 8 servings.
HOLIDAY COFFEE
3/4 cup ground coffee
4 cup water
1/2 cup sweetened condensed milk
Whipped cream
4 (3-inch) sticks cinnamon
4 maraschino cherries with stems
Prepare coffee according to manufacturer's directions using 3/4 cup ground coffee and 4 cups water. Stir sweetened condensed milk into coffee, and serve immediate with a dollop of whipped cream, a stick of cinnamon and a maraschino cherry.
Makes 4 1/2 cups.
WHITE HOT CHOCOLATE
3 cups half-and-half, divided
(1/4 cup and 2 3/4 cups)
2/3 cup vanilla baking chips
1 cinnamon stick
1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon almond extract
Ground cinnamon for garnishing
Place 1/4 cup cream, vanilla chips, cinnamon stick and nutmeg in saucepan. Stir over low heat until chips are melted Discard cinnamon stick. Add remaining cream. Stir until thoroughly heated. Remove from the heat, Add vanilla and almond extracts. Pour into 4 cups. Garnish with ground cinnamon.
CARAMEL MILK
Makes 2 servings.
2 cups milk
5 tablespoons packed brown sugar, divided
1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract, divided
Pour milk into microwave-safe medium glass bowl. Heat on HIGH (100% power) in microwave until hot, about 80 to 90 seconds.
Carefully pour milk into 2 mugs. Stir half of the brown sugar and vanilla extract into each mug. Serve warm.

The following recipes for non-alcoholic beverages generally are created for a single drink. Each recipe has both visual and flavor appeal.
MEXICAN SUNSET (1 serving)
1 cup chilled orange juice
1/2 jigger grenadine
Pour orange juice into tall glasses. Add grenadine and allow to settle on bottom. May be served over ice.
PINA COLADA PERFECTO (1 serving)
1 jigger crème of coconut
2 jiggers pineapple juice
1 1/2 jiggers club soda
Mix over ice
NOON ON THE EQUATOR (1 serving)
1/4 cup orange juice
1 ½ tsp grenadine syrup
1/4 cup tomato juice
1/4 tsp Worcestershire sauce
Juice of 1/4 lemon
Dash of Tabasco sauce
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
Combine all ingredients in cocktail shaker and add ice cubes.
Shake well and strain into glasses.
ALMOND JOYOUS
Serves 2.
This is a delicious drinkable rendition of the infamous Almond Joy candy bar.
1 cup light coconut milk
1 1/2 cups chocolate sorbet
2 fresh bananas, frozen and sliced
2 tablespoons grated coconut
(optional)
1 teaspoon coconut extract
3/4 teaspoon almond extract
Combine the coconut milk and sorbet in a blender. Add the bananas, coconut (if using), coconut extract, and almond extract. Blend until smooth.
* NOTE - To freeze bananas: Peel bananas and seal in a plastic bag. Freeze. When ready to use, remove from freezer and slice.
BLACK FOREST MOCHA
Serves: 1
2/3 cup hot brewed coffee
2 tablespoons HERSHEY'S® Chocolate Syrup
2 tablespoons light cream
1 tablespoon maraschino cherry juice
Whipped cream (optional)
Maraschino cherry (optional)
In large mug, stir together coffee, Hershey’s Chocolate Syrup, cream and cherry juice. Garnish with whipped cream and cherry, if desired.
Serve immediately.
BLUEBERRY BOG SPARKLER
Mix 3 cups blueberry-cranberry drink with 2 cups prepared lemonade in a large pitcher. Chill well.
Just before serving, stirring in 1 1/2 cups icy cold ginger ale.
CHEESECAKE FLOAT
4 ounces soft style cream cheese
12 ounces strawberry soda
2 scoops berry frozen yogurt or vanilla ice cream
Blend together soft-style cream cheese and strawberry pop (3 parts soda to1 part cream cheese).
Add scoops of frozen yogurt.
CHOCOLATE CARAMEL CAPPUCCINO
Makes 2 to 3 servings
1 cup hot water
3/4 cup milk
2 tablespoons Chocolate Flavor NESTLÉ® NESQUIK Syrup
3 tablespoons caramel ice cream topping
1 tablespoon TASTER'S CHOICE®
100% Pure Instant Coffee
Place water, milk, Nesquik, caramel topping and TASTER'S CHOICE in a microwave-safe pitcher. Microwave
on HIGH (100%) power for 2 to 3 minutes or until hot; stir.
Serve immediately.
CRANBERRY EGGNOG
6 eggs, separated
4 tablespoons granulated sugar
1-quart cranberry juice
2 cups heavy whipping cream
Dash of ground nutmeg
Beat egg yolks until lemon colored. Add 2 tablespoons of sugar and beat for 5 minutes more. Set aside.
Beat whites until soft peaks form. Gradually add remaining 2 tablespoons of sugar to the whites.
Beat until stiff and glossy. Fold whites into yolk mixture. Stir in
cold juice and cream. Sprinkle with nutmeg. Refrigerate.
EASY PUDDING MILK SHAKE
3 cups cold milk
1 small box instant Jell-O Pudding, any flavor
1 1/2 cups ice cream, any flavor
Pour milk into blender container.
Add pudding mix and Ice Cream; cover. Blend on high speed 30 seconds or until smooth. Pour into glasses and garnish as desired. Serve immediately.
FRESH TOMATO JUICE COCKTAIL
11 cups fresh tomatoes
3 cup chopped celery
3/4 cup chopped green bell pepper
2 bay leaves
3 tablespoons chopped onion
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
3 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
1 1/2 teaspoons horseradish
3 dashes Tabasco sauce
Cook tomatoes, celery, green pepper, bay leaves and onion for 20 minutes, then put through a sieve.
Add remaining ingredients. Chill.
GODIVA FROZEN HOT CHOCOLATE
4 cups whole milk
12 tablespoons Godiva Classic Milk Chocolate Cocoa *
2 cup heavy whipping cream
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
2 tablespoons granulated sugar
2 tablespoons milk chocolate shavings
* You can also use Dark Chocolate Truffle Cocoa or Chocolate Mocha Cocoa.

Warm the milk in a small pot over a medium flame. Stir in the cocoa and whisk constantly. Do not boil. Remove from the stove and cover with foil. Let cool for 15 minutes.
Pour the hot cocoa mixture in to ice cube trays or a metal bowl. Freeze. Remove the chocolaty mixture from the freezer and allow to soften for approximately 20 minutes.
Drop the slushy cubes or chunks into a blender. Pulse intermittently until smooth and slightly icy. You may have to add a little fresh milk to help with the process.
Immediately pour into a large glass bowl. Top with fresh whipped cream and milk chocolate shavings. Sink a straw in for everyone at your table.
Sip and enjoy!
HÄAGEN-DAZS® LEMON CHIFFON SHAKE
Source: haagen-dazs.com
1 pint (2 cups) Haagen-Dazs®
Vanilla ice cream, slightly softened*
3/4 cup skim milk
3 tablespoons frozen lemonade concentrate
In blender container, combine all ingredients. Cover; blend until smooth.
Serve immediately.
4 (3/4 cup) servings.
*Tip: To soften ice cream, put container in the refrigerator for 15 to 20 minutes or until easy to scoop.
HOT CHOCOLATE TO DIE FOR
2 to 3 ounces milk chocolate
1 teaspoon butter
1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 cup half-and-half or cream
For each cup, in a double boiler combine the chocolate, butter and vanilla extract. Stir together until completely melted and smooth. Then add the half-and-half or cream slowly, incorporating it gradually as it heats, but do not boil.
Serve over a handful of miniature marshmallows garnished with a dash of nutmeg.
HOT DR. PEPPER ®
12 ounces Dr. Pepper®
2 lemon slices
Pour the Dr. Pepper® into a saucepan. Heat until it is hot and bubbly, at exactly 170 degrees F. Place a lemon slice in the bottom of each of two mugs. Pour the Dr. Pepper® into the mugs, then serve immediately.

ITALIAN CREAM SODA
Fill a 16 ounce glass with ice and add 4 tablespoons flavored syrup (for drinks...like hazelnut or vanilla).
Fill with club soda to within 1 inch from top. Top off with whipped cream on top (optional).
LEMONADE SHAKE
1 pint vanilla ice cream, softened
1 (12 ounce) can lemon-lime soda
1/4 cup frozen lemonade concentrate
2 drops yellow food coloring (if desired)
Combine ice cream, soda and lemonade concentrate in a 1-quart container with a lid. Cover and shake until smooth. If desired, add food coloring, cover and shake again.
Makes 2 cups.
LEMONADE TEA
2 family-size tea bags
1-quart water
1 1/2 cups granulated sugar
1 (10 ounce) can frozen lemonade
2 quarts water
Bring 1 quart water to boil. Add tea bags and turn off heat. Steep tea for 10 minutes. Remove tea bags and discard. Add remaining ingredients.
Mix and refrigerate.
To serve, add 1 two-liter bottle ginger ale Serve over ice.

MARASCHINO CHERRY LEMONADE
1 cup hot water
3/4 cup granulated sugar
4 cups cold water
1/2 cup fresh lemon juice
6 ounces undrained maraschino cherries.
In a large pitcher, combine hot water and sugar; stir until sugar is dissolved. Add cold water, lemon juice and cherries with their juice; mix well.
Serve over ice.

MEXICAN COCOA
2 cups milk
3 (1-inch) cinnamon sticks
4 ounces bittersweet chocolate, broken into small pieces
2 tablespoons dark brown sugar
Ground cinnamon (optional)
Heat milk and cinnamon sticks over low heat until steaming. Do not boil. Place chocolate and sugar in warm, small bowl. Discard cinnamon sticks. Pour milk over chocolate
and sugar and let stand 1 minute. Whisk until dissolved.
Serve in mugs with a sprinkling of cinnamon, if desired.
Makes 2 servings.
MINT COW
2 tablespoons chocolate syrup
1/8 teaspoon mint or peppermint flavoring
1 cup milk
1 scoop or 1/2 cup ice cream
Mix syrup with milk and peppermint. Stir well and add ice cream.

NUTTY VANILLA MILK
2 cups milk
2 tablespoons granulated sugar
1/4 teaspoon almond extract
3/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
Pour milk into microwave-safe glass bowl and heat on HIGH (100% power) until it is hot, about 80 seconds.
Stir remaining ingredients into hot milk, and mix until thoroughly combined. Pour into mugs and serve immediately.
Makes 2 servings.
ORANGE BLISS
1 (6 ounce) can frozen orange juice concentrate
1 1/2 cup ice cold water
4 large marshmallows
1 cup vanilla ice cream
15 ice cubes
Pour into blender orange juice and water. Blend approximately 5 seconds or until mixture it liquid.
Add ice cream, marshmallows and enough ice cubes so that when they are finely crushed the mixture will be thick like a milk shake. Since ice cubes vary in size you may have to add or delete a few.
Pour into serving glasses and garnish with an orange slice or marshmallow and cherry.

ORANGE CREAM
4 cups orange juice
3 cinnamon sticks
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
1 pint vanilla ice cream
In a large saucepan, combine orange juice, cinnamon and vanilla over medium-high heat. Bring mixture to a boil, and reduce to low heat. Simmer 10 minutes. Remove cinnamon sticks. Stir in ice cream. Cook over low heat, stirring constantly, until heated through. Do not allow mixture to boil. Serve with mini marshmallows if desired.
Makes 4 to 6 servings.
PEACHY YOGURT COOLER
1/2 cup milk
1 (6 ounce) container Yoplait Original peach yogurt
1 peach, peeled and cut-up
Ground nutmeg
Place milk, yogurt and peach in the blender. Cover and blend on high speed about 30 seconds or until smooth. Sprinkle with nutmeg.
PINEAPPLE-BANANA SLUSH
1 medium-size ripe banana
1 1/2 cups pineapple juice
2 tablespoons honey
Ice cubes
Combine first 3 ingredients in container of an electric blender.
Add enough ice cubes to measure 3 cups. Blend until smooth. Serve immediately.
RUSSIAN TEA
2 cups Tang
1/2 cup instant tea
1 package powdered lemonade mix
1 1/4 cups granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
1 teaspoon cinnamon
Mix together well. Store in a covered jar, and use as you would instant tea.
STRAWBERRY-CHEESECAKE SHAKE
1 (10 ounce) package frozen
sliced strawberries, thawed
3 ounces cream cheese, softened
1 pint vanilla ice cream
1/2 cup milk
Combine all ingredients in blender container; process mixture until smooth. Serve immediately.
TIDEWATER TEA
1 quart strong tea
1 cup cherry juice
3 tablespoons lemon juice
1/4 cup orange juice
4 whole cloves
1 stick cinnamon
Simmer for about 30 minutes. Serve hot.
This makes 4 to 6 servings.
TWINKIE MALT
2 cups milk
6 Hostess Twinkies
4 Oreo cookies
3 cups vanilla ice cream
1/3 cup milk
Blend milk and Twinkies for 5 to 10 seconds. Add Oreo cookies. Blend together. Add 3 cups vanilla ice cream. Blend until smooth. Pour in milk and enjoy.
VIENNESE CHOCOLATE
4 ounces semisweet chocolate
1/3 cup granulated sugar
1/3 teaspoon salt
1 1/3 cups boiling water
4 cups scalded milk
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 cup heavy cream, whipped
Melt chocolate in top of a double boiler over hot water. Stir in sugar and salt and slowly add boiling water, blending well. Add scalded milk. Simmer the mixture for a few minutes and then beat with a whisk until frothy. Add vanilla extract.
Serve chocolate from a heated coffee pot and use demitasse cups. Add whipped cream separately.
 

Seasonal Simple Safety Steps

Monday, 12 December 2016 16:23

A good way to begin a day is with a hearty breakfast.  A staple of many morning meals is toasted bread or bagel.  Also a toaster that is reluctant to “release a piece of toasted bread becomes a dangerous safety threat.  The Newtown Square Fire Company, a 100-plus year community protection organization began it toaster safety suggestion with a simple statement, “Avoid possible life-threatening dangers and a possible dangerous fire through the simple ‘remove the danger by unplugging the toaster’.”

Newtown Square’s Fire Chief Doug Everlof added, “Far too often, there are reports of hungry toast makers trying to dislodge a piece of stubborn of bread or a bagel by using a fork, a knife or some other available metal kitchen device, all without removing the electrical danger. This is simply done by removing the appliance’s plug from the wall receptacle. Once the electrical danger is eliminated, there are several simple ways to retrieve the item being toasted.’

Using the commercially available, non-metallic tools constructed for the safe removal of jammed food items lodged in the toaster is far better than using metal eating or cooking utensils.  Always be gentle in this removal process.

Echoing his safety concerns from previously shared comments, Deputy Fire Chief George Guyer IV volunteered, “Even when a removal of food is done with an ‘unplugged toaster’ there are other dangers.  By using any rigid removal tool, the unseen, obscured heating wires can be moved from internal supports. When the toaster is used after the unrecognized, unintentional moving of the heating elements can either make unwanted alteration to pattern of the heating wires or an unwanted heating wire contact with the metal case of the toaster. “

Both events can be dangerous. The changes in the wiring patterns can result in fire. The unseen contact by any of the dislodged heating wires and the metal shell of the toasting device can result in the possibility of an electric shock or produce a fire.

Commenting on the combined activities of the holiday period, Chief Doug Everlof added, “Simple, but effective safety steps are key ingredients in both fire and injury prevention. This is the time of the year for fun and family, not for injuries or fires.  Please include safety in all of the family’s activities.”

 

Saturday Night Fire

Monday, 12 December 2016 10:45

As many residents of Newtown Square’s Larchmont neighborhood were either thinking about bedtime or watching late Saturday night television on December 10, a series of events altered lives and properties on both Northwood and Barren Road.   Calls to the Delaware County Fire Dispatch at approximately 11:16 p.m.  told of afire whose flames were visible more than a block away.

As apparatus of Newtown Square’s and Broomall’s Fire Companies approached the reported Northwood, near Dutton Drive location, their radio messages echoed the initially reported information supplied to the Delaware County 9 1 1   These initial fire ground reports added the heavily involved fire was in a building located at rear of the property,  

This on-scene report validated the initial dispatch including fire crews and apparatus from Upper Providence’s Rose Tree Fire Company and a specialty-service Rapid Intervention Crew from the Media Fire Company.  Also included were medical crews from Riddle Hospital. As these initial firefighters approached the fiercely burning structure, they found the intensity of the seemingly well-fueled fire had ignited a parked car and had begun to melt the siding of the adjacent residence.

This heat and flames from this building at the rear of the Northwood property across the property border to ignite a nearby building belonging to a Barren Road neighbor.

The amount of post-extinguishing activities, including overhaul, also included working with the Newtown Township Fire Marshal in his routine investigation. These responsibilities prompted a cooperative request for the dispatch of a ladder truck from Haverford Township’s Brookline Fire Company and a pumper from West Chester, Chester County.  While staged to respond from the Newtown Square Fire Company, they performed cover-up services for emergencies in both Newtown and Marple Townships.

 

Basic Emergency Tools

Thursday, 01 December 2016 13:39

In the event of an emergency prompted by natural events or any event that results in a family or neighborhood isolation or loss of utilities, families must be prepared to meet these challenges.  The Newtown Square Fire Company has prepared recommendations for basic survival is a basic collection of Emergency supplies.  This collection should be for a minimum, three-day emergency.

To meet the challenges of emergencies, being prepared and being calm are key ingredients in assuring safety. The most basic life-sustaining item is water.

To be basically prepared for a period of isolation, the Newtown Square Fire Company suggests a minimum of one gallon of bottled water per person per day. Deputy Fire Chief George Guyer IV has suggested using a collection of smaller, individual bottles for this life sustaining water.

Food supplies should comprise of items that do not require either cooking or refrigeration.  The nutrients are of greater importance than methods of preparations. With this concept in mind, a list of foods might include, in part, the following:

  • Canned goods (for example: meat, tuna, soup, fruit, vegetables)
  • Food bars (for example: protein, cereal, granola)
  • Infant supplies (formula, food, and diapers)

Remember to include a manual can opener.

First aid supplies, while not limited to the following, should include:

  • Bandages of assortment of sizes and types.
  • Antiseptic spray or antibiotic ointment
  • Aspirin and non-aspirin pain relievers
  • Family medical supplies, well labeled, and copies of prescriptions

Flashlights and extra batteries Radio with extra batteries

Cell phone extending battery and/or solar cell charger

Matches in water-proofing container and/or a lighter

Convenience Items:
Paper plates and cups, plus plastic forks, knives, and spoons
Plastic storage containers and sealable bags
Toilet paper and facial tissues

Personal care items:
Toothbrush, toothpaste, and dental floss
Soap, antibacterial wipes
Feminine supplies

Do not forget to included ideas and supplies for the family pets.  The local firefighters remind residents to include a minimum three-day supply of pet food and adequate water for these important family companions.

 

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Run Statistics

Run Statistics

2017 Calls
2016 Total 686
2015 Total 618
2014 Total 689
2013 Total 685
2012 Total 728
2011 Total 755
2010 Total 707
2009 Total 582
2008 Total 616
2007 Total 547

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Latest Biddle's Corner

Saturday Night Fire

As many residents of Newtown Square’s Larchmont neighborhood were either thinking about bedtime or watching late Saturday night television on December 10, a series of events altered lives and properties on both Northwood and Barren Road.   Calls to the Delaware County Fire Dispatch at approximately 11:16 p.m.  told of afire whose flames were visible more than a block away.

As apparatus of Newtown Square’s and Broomall’s Fire Companies approached the reported Northwood, near Dutton Drive location, their radio messages echoed the initially reported information supplied to the Delaware County 9 1 1   These initial fire ground reports added the heavily involved fire was in a building located at rear of the property,  

This on-scene report validated the initial dispatch including fire crews and apparatus from Upper Providence’s Rose Tree Fire Company and a specialty-service Rapid Intervention Crew from the Media Fire Company.  Also included were medical crews from Riddle Hospital. As these initial firefighters approached the fiercely burning structure, they found the intensity of the seemingly well-fueled fire had ignited a parked car and had begun to melt the siding of the adjacent residence.

This heat and flames from this building at the rear of the Northwood property across the property border to ignite a nearby building belonging to a Barren Road neighbor.

The amount of post-extinguishing activities, including overhaul, also included working with the Newtown Township Fire Marshal in his routine investigation. These responsibilities prompted a cooperative request for the dispatch of a ladder truck from Haverford Township’s Brookline Fire Company and a pumper from West Chester, Chester County.  While staged to respond from the Newtown Square Fire Company, they performed cover-up services for emergencies in both Newtown and Marple Townships.

 
Shelter-in-Place Option

A collection of events has prompted Newtown Square Fire Chief Doug Everlof to share some emergency suggestions were prompted by recent events.  He began by saying, “Many followers of both recent television and radio news may have been introduced to a form of emergency response that is growing in effectiveness and acceptance. “


The event Chief Everlof was citing was a collection of Monday, November 28, mid-morning events that occurred on the sprawling Columbus, Ohio campus of The Ohio State University. A forced vehicle accident resulting in pedestrian injuries followed eight stabbings by what was described as a “butcher knife,” became responsible for a growing response to community emergencies—Sheltering-In-Place.


Ohio State University students returned to the Columbus campus following a Thanksgiving exodus and those students who experienced the emotions of the Saturday, November 26 double-overtime, 30-27 victory over arch rival University of Michigan returned to the campus with an academic mission. With the upcoming, mid-December final exams for the school’s Autumn Semester, OSU students were well focused until a collection of student injuries at a 9:52 a.m. campus incident.


The sound of gunshots on campus spawned University official to declare a Shelter-In-Place statement.   As has become favored, a well-advised practice for academic installations, this safety-practice incorporates seeking safety within the nearby, normally occupied structure.   This concept contrasts with the relocation to a possible remote, large evacuation site.


Shelter-In Place—often also known as a “lockdown”—is being viewed as an increasing effective way to address emergencies.  Joining in a Newtown Square Fire Company endorsement of the wisdom as this being a possible emergency response, are county, state, and federal organizations. Having the means to keep informed becomes a key ingredient in decision-making by person who may need instructions.  The use of cell phone communications—both voice and text, interior building communications, and the local electronic media all become important ingredients in the selection of safety choices.


Newtown Square’s fire chief explained, “National evaluation states there are instances where it can be wise to seek safety within the building you already occupy, rather than to evacuate the area or seek a community emergency shelter.”


Included in a list of risks are those that includes chemical, biological, or radiological contaminants.  This class of risks can be an accidental or an intentional release. If this class of dangers is known, people at risk should select a small, interior room, with no or few windows, and taking refuge there.


Sheltering in Place involves closing all household doors, windows and vents and taking immediate shelter in a readily accessible location that puts as much physical protection and indoor air and/or radiation shielding-mass between individuals and the outside hazardous.  This may include a basement or centrally located medium to small room.


If the emergency involves a school, a secured classroom is often a wise choice.  As was shown in recent television news, the fortress collection of chairs and tables barricading the room’s door became what appeared to be a sturdy defense.


In another type of emergency—one involving air contamination or radiation dangers—wise safety steps may include making the fortress as airtight as possible by shutting off all ventilation/HVAC systems. Additional protection can be achieved by a creative sealing the shelter's doors and windows from all outside air contaminants with damp towels, or if available, plastic sheeting and adhesive tape.


National analysis has shown Shelter-In-Place effectiveness has been evaluated by experts and it has been shown that proper sealing can make a substantial difference to a normal home shelter.  It has been found to be at least twice as effective against a host of airborne substances when compared against simply staying inside and not implementing some form protection the military, “Shelter-in-Place" is comparable to "buttoning up" and has proved life-saving in certain nuclear fallout instances.


A key ingredient that has general backing is the concept to Run from the Danger, Hide from the source of the risk, and if confronted and if there is alternative—Fight for your life and those of others