NEWTOWN SQUARE FIRE COMPANY RECRUITMENT NIGHT

Saturday, 07 October 2017 12:17

NEWTOWN SQUARE FIRE COMPANY IS HOSTING A RECRUITMENT NIGHT

WHEN: THURSDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2017
TIME: 5PM TO 8PM
WHERE: NEWTOWN SQUARE FIRE STATION
8 NORTH NEWTOWN STREET RD
NEWTOWN SQUARE, PA 19073
The Newtown Square Fire Company is looking for Men and Women interested in serving their community.
We have the following positions available:

-Junior Firefighter (16-17 yoa)
-Firefighter
-Fire Police Officer
-Administrative Member
-Auxiliary
Stop by the Fire Station and speak with our members one-on-one, tour the station and apparatus.
Membership application can be found HERE.
 

Year Round Dangers

Monday, 10 July 2017 07:21

When a Delaware County-fire pager shared an alert message telling of Carbon Monoxide alert, a passerby hearing this report commented, “Why can there be a “CO” alert this time of the year. Who has their home heater working in 90-degree weather?”

What is Carbon Monoxide “CO”?

This colorless, odorless gas is produced by burning any material that contains carbon. Examples of these fuels are those of wood, natural or bottled gas, and oil. This CO gas cannot be seen, smelled, or tasted. Also, its poison traits can cause brain damage and death.

Source of CO are often forgotten

The comment calmly shared by the Newtown Square firefighter shed some enlightening information about the odder-less, killer product of many forms of combustion.  The local firefighter explained that in some homes, the domestic water heating is done by a water heater connected to the oil-fired home heating system.  In the summer, while the furnace part of the combination is dormant, the oil-heated home water is heated by a portion of this combination system.

The key concept in the production of this killer gas is many forms of combustion. These fumes can come from a gas or oil fuel water heater, an indoor cooking appliance, a gas fueled clothes dryer, or on a chilly night, an improperly vented fireplace being used to reduce a seasonal chill.

Other possible warm weather causes of CO

There are other seasonal projects that create this killer gas.  A poorly placed gas or charcoal cooker, or any non-electric home heating system can become a source of carbon monoxide if used with no pre-seasonal, preventative inspection.

Also, there have been instances when a quick stop at home becomes interrupted by a telephone call.  This type of phone call can distract the driver; instead of returning to the car with its engine running, the car remains unattended and Carbon Monoxide can make its way into the living area of the home.  This collection of the possible fatal gas is a danger to all forms of life within the structure.

 

The symptoms of Carbon Monoxide poisoning

Headaches

Dizziness

Nausea

Flu-like symptoms and fatigue

 

What to do if Carbon Monoxide is suspected

Leave the suspected trouble areas.   Make sure any persons who many need evacuation help are provided this assistance.  Cordless or cell phones must be used to contact 9 1 1 from a preplanned external, safe location. This report to seek help will tell of the possible problem and the meeting location of the evacuated occupants of the structure.

NO ONE RETURNS TO THIS TROUBLE AREA UNTIL TOLD IT IS SAFE

The Newtown Square Fire Company has a collection of special safety equipment used to locate the sources of Carbon Monoxide and other dangerous fumes. In additional to these special safety tools, they also wear protective firefighting gear that is another form of protection for these skilled, community protectors.

Chief Doug Everlof has shared some simple, but wise thoughts,  “Avoid the temptation to return to any area that has experienced Carbon Monoxide.  Only when the dangers have been corrected, follow the instructions of the safety personnel before any return.”

 

Follow the Message

Friday, 07 July 2017 07:57

As many workers were driving to work or when travelling later Wednesday, July 5, they learned the news telling of a preventable fatality in a Bensalem, Bucks County fire.   In the broadcast of this morning news story and carry-over coverage in the midday television and daytime news, there was a special message often heard by Delaware County residents.

The message shared by the Bensalem fire official duplicated a life-safety suggestion offered many times by Newtown Square Fire Company Chief Doug Everlof.   The life of the 39-year-old, Bucks County resident was lost in the fire because she re-entered the burning home to rescue a pet.

Chief Everlof has many times volunteered, “Please remember the important saying in any kind of fire—Get Out, Call Out, and Stay Out.

Once out of a fire area, everyone must avoid the temptation to return to a burning area.  Many lives have been lost in attempts to rescue lives of family members, friends, or pets.  It is common to learn the feared-lost people or pets will have made their way out of the building.

A companion reminder has again been shared by Chief Everlof.  He volunteered, “Whenever the above safety message is shared, always go and stay at an established, reinforced safe, special, and four-season meeting location.”

 

 

Training Displays Firefighter Rescue Skills

Friday, 07 July 2017 07:53

The targets of the ongoing training of the Newtown Square Fire Company are traditionally focused on all members of the local 100-plus year community life- and property-saving organization.  This was demonstrated by a recent educational exercise. As both a challenge for upcoming training evaluations for current students attending a current Rescue Intervention Team (RIT) training program as well as the remainder of the Newtown Square Fire Company members

The background for details about this potential, life-saving RIT process and some specifics behind the RIT-member’s skills and activities are included in an earlier feature provided by the Newtown Square Fire Company

This recent RIT training was directed by Engine Captain Chris Young. This realistic education session was held within the local fire station located on North Newtown Street Road. Every part of the exercise duplicated similar events in a typical fire, with one exception.

That single exception was the sound of a telltale, warning sound from a Personal Alert Safety System (PASS Device).  This lifesaving, alert tool is assigned to the portable breathing apparatus used by local fire fighters.  This current safety device senses when the firefighter is not able or capable of moving.  A very identifiable sound from changes both the mood of the other firefighters as well as beginning a special rescue focus by a set of firefighters—crew members of the RIT.

Captain Young replicated the blinding of the RIT members would experience in a smoke-filled area.  By covering the by covering the face masks of the combined RIT members, this team was required to do a thorough search for the source of the alerting device.

This combination of the response to an immediate alerting sound “screaming” through blinding conditions that parrot what would be experienced in a realistic search for a “downed” firefighter.  Using their individual experiences in firefighting, several investigations were used as these RIT members found a louder path to the missing sound source

Controlling their adrenaline demands, these dedicated, specially-skilled firefighters continued to move in their quest for this “missing person’s warning sound source.  This goal found the stranded pseudo firefighter, a 180-pound stuffed training dummy.  He was located under a bunk in the upper floor sleeping area of the fire station.

The successful radio message alerting the training commander of this discovery and rescue was welcomed information shared by all the attendees at the evening training.   Chief Doug Everlof added, “This location, and ‘life saving effort’ is a reward for team training and RIT efforts”

 

Knowing the Meaning of Signs

Wednesday, 05 July 2017 12:08

As the summer months become a time for driving vacations or other travels, it is a common practice that s local-based driver may be faced with some roadside signs that are not instantly determined. The Newtown Square Fire Company advises, “If these travels are outside the United States, there will possibly including metric measures and speed indications.”

Triangular signs are commonly used to draw attention to special warnings and indications of possible hazards or nearby threats.

Poison

Flammable

Highly Flammable Liquid Sign

Danger Highly Flammable Gases Sign

Danger Solvents Sign

Sulfuric Acid Sign

Danger Highly Flammable LPG Sign

Highly Flammable Store Sign

Danger Caustic Sign

Dangerous Chemicals Sign


In addition to the signs, above, in this listing, there are other Informative Signs available.

Flammable Gas Sign

Corrosive Sign Risk Sign

Danger Highly Flammable Material Sign

Danger Acid Sign Dangerous When Wet Sign

Entering a hazardous area Sign

Flammable Sign

Risk of Corrosion Sign

Ammonia Sign

Hazardous area Sign

Biological Hazard Sign

Danger Corrosive Sign

Compressed Gas Sign

Danger Toxic Sign

Hazardous Waste Sign

Dangerous Fumes Sign

What began as a symbol for poisons — the Skull and Crossed Bones — was viewed by many as being ineffective.  An alternative Poison signage has become very informative

The facial image of Mr. Yuk promptly tells the proper message.

MR  YUK

 

 

Rescue Skill Training Explained

Monday, 03 July 2017 11:22

The Newtown Square Fire Company has been undergoing multiple purpose training sessions that were spawned by social and living style changes.  This life-saving training has had its growth in these constantly changing life styles

STEP ONE

As the commercial, residential, and vehicular, activities busy Newtown Square fire and rescue personnel find the increased materials in each emergency calls are synthetic products.  They have replaced a onetime dependence upon natural materials. These newer, manufactured materials have created new safety challenges, as well as new forms of operations.

The initial sound. The smoke in early steps of today’s fires activates building’s fire alerting devices.  The telltale wail of the alerting sound from a structural Smoke Detector is a welcome sound that initiates the saving of lives.

There is also a second sound—one that may be heard later in a fire. This unwanted warning sound has a differing function, one that alerts of a second type of an emergency.  This alerting sound may have its origins in a special, alerting device that be activated by an injured, immobile, or unconscious firefighter/rescuer working in a search for a non-located occupant or trapped person or extinguishing the fire.

The source of this second, emergency sound comes from the special PASS Device. This four-letter abbreviation describes a valuable alerting device—Personal Alerting Safety System.  This alert source aids locating a trapped, injured, or otherwise disoriented or immobilized firefighter or rescuer.

This device in its more recent application has become a traditional part of the Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA) that provides a safe, source of compressed air which permits firefighters to work in a normally unsafe and often a dangerous environment.

STEP TWO

It is a common practice for firefighters to find themselves working in specific tasks that can quickly grow into unexpected levels of risk.  The secret that promises a hoped for a wanted, positive outcome is having an on-call rescue team— the Rapid Intervention Team (RIT).  These special firefighters are skilled, properly equipped and trained to locate and remove the trapped/injured firefighters.  There are pre-determined events when a is placed in service   RIT should be placed in service when requested by the emergency’s Incident Commander when it is considered this team is neede

Also, any time firefighters are ”on air” (using a compressed air system, a.k.a. SCBA) inside a structure or a hazard area there should be an RIT in service.  The RIT is to remain in service until released by the Incident Commander.

RIT members must be guide by the AWARE concept:

Air separate air supply for victim

Water supply to protect the rescue and withdrawal

A Radio frequency established for the victim

Extrication tools needed to withdraw the victim

RIT members will be expected to operate under well established, determined rules. They must be under direction of the Incident Commander or an alternately determined leader.  Without rules there would be chaos.

STEP THREE

Every activity and responsibility of RIT team members is to locate and stabilize in any appropriate ways that will aid in a prompt and safe removal of a trapped or injured emergency service member.

These members will not do any firefighting, except any needed to aid and transport the emergency service member.  RIT teams traditionally have a minimum of two members of the team, with more if required.  No one leaves this responsibility until relieved.

When available, the RIT will obtain a safety-firefighting water hose from a pumping source not used in primary firefighting. This assures a constant, emergency source of water.   A collection of specific RIT tools should be carried to a safe location that is near the incident

To help assure uninterrupted emergency communications during an RIT activity, a separate radio frequency should be established for this RIT operation; an assurance of emergency communications is a primary tool.

Newtown Square firefighters have been trained to provide a collection of trained RIT specialists.  Currently, additional firefighters are being schooled to increase the local pool of RIT-qualified service providers.  The current methods used in safe firefighting are not all the once-traditional tools—they now are adding advanced concepts and skills.

 

 

Danger To Be Avoided

Saturday, 01 July 2017 17:07

In addition to the dangers from fires and damages that have their origins from non-professional fireworks are injuries felt by children “playing” with the seemingly innocent handheld sparklers.  Why do the young eyes enjoy the enhancing, glowing vision?  The curious children, as well as their family, are not aware these dangerous, burning temperatures of these dangerous “sparks” of hot, burning metal particles of sparkler’s glowing material have serious dangers..

A burning sparkler produces injuring, hot materials that have temperatures in the same ranges of a burning candle or a ignited match.  These glowing “sparks” can cause painful, possible long-lasting skin burns. Equally dangerous is the igniting of clothing.

The simple safety slogan taught to school-age students has hopefully been either remembered by parents from their own school days or more recently shared by school-age children.  This safety message, “Stop!  Drop! And Roll!” Is a wise safety tool that works for people of any age..

A secondary safety tool that should wisely accompany any type of fireworks is a bucket of water.  The wet contents can provide cooling and extinguishing of small, nearby burns. Also, at the end of any use of sparklers, use this water bucket to cool and extinguish any remaining burning temperatures.

Using a nearby cell phone, immediately call 9 1 1.   This form of immediate help that is provided by on-location, medical providers is a wise, emergency step.  Never attempt to use any alternative, home-provided hospital transport for any burns or injuries.

When making any determinations about the use of sparklers, the Newtown Square Fire Company has a safe alternative.  Chief Doug Everlof offered an alternative too for holiday type fun when he suggested, “Avoid using sparklers and wisely use the long lasting ‘glow sticks.’  They don’t use fire and they last for hours.”

 

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Run Statistics

Run Statistics

2017 Calls
2016 Total 686
2015 Total 618
2014 Total 689
2013 Total 685
2012 Total 728
2011 Total 755
2010 Total 707
2009 Total 582
2008 Total 616
2007 Total 547

DPCalendar

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Latest Biddle's Corner

Follow the Message

As many workers were driving to work or when travelling later Wednesday, July 5, they learned the news telling of a preventable fatality in a Bensalem, Bucks County fire.   In the broadcast of this morning news story and carry-over coverage in the midday television and daytime news, there was a special message often heard by Delaware County residents.

The message shared by the Bensalem fire official duplicated a life-safety suggestion offered many times by Newtown Square Fire Company Chief Doug Everlof.   The life of the 39-year-old, Bucks County resident was lost in the fire because she re-entered the burning home to rescue a pet.

Chief Everlof has many times volunteered, “Please remember the important saying in any kind of fire—Get Out, Call Out, and Stay Out.

Once out of a fire area, everyone must avoid the temptation to return to a burning area.  Many lives have been lost in attempts to rescue lives of family members, friends, or pets.  It is common to learn the feared-lost people or pets will have made their way out of the building.

A companion reminder has again been shared by Chief Everlof.  He volunteered, “Whenever the above safety message is shared, always go and stay at an established, reinforced safe, special, and four-season meeting location.”

 

 
Training Displays Firefighter Rescue Skills

The targets of the ongoing training of the Newtown Square Fire Company are traditionally focused on all members of the local 100-plus year community life- and property-saving organization.  This was demonstrated by a recent educational exercise. As both a challenge for upcoming training evaluations for current students attending a current Rescue Intervention Team (RIT) training program as well as the remainder of the Newtown Square Fire Company members

The background for details about this potential, life-saving RIT process and some specifics behind the RIT-member’s skills and activities are included in an earlier feature provided by the Newtown Square Fire Company

This recent RIT training was directed by Engine Captain Chris Young. This realistic education session was held within the local fire station located on North Newtown Street Road. Every part of the exercise duplicated similar events in a typical fire, with one exception.

That single exception was the sound of a telltale, warning sound from a Personal Alert Safety System (PASS Device).  This lifesaving, alert tool is assigned to the portable breathing apparatus used by local fire fighters.  This current safety device senses when the firefighter is not able or capable of moving.  A very identifiable sound from changes both the mood of the other firefighters as well as beginning a special rescue focus by a set of firefighters—crew members of the RIT.

Captain Young replicated the blinding of the RIT members would experience in a smoke-filled area.  By covering the by covering the face masks of the combined RIT members, this team was required to do a thorough search for the source of the alerting device.

This combination of the response to an immediate alerting sound “screaming” through blinding conditions that parrot what would be experienced in a realistic search for a “downed” firefighter.  Using their individual experiences in firefighting, several investigations were used as these RIT members found a louder path to the missing sound source

Controlling their adrenaline demands, these dedicated, specially-skilled firefighters continued to move in their quest for this “missing person’s warning sound source.  This goal found the stranded pseudo firefighter, a 180-pound stuffed training dummy.  He was located under a bunk in the upper floor sleeping area of the fire station.

The successful radio message alerting the training commander of this discovery and rescue was welcomed information shared by all the attendees at the evening training.   Chief Doug Everlof added, “This location, and ‘life saving effort’ is a reward for team training and RIT efforts”