Do It Now

Tuesday, 07 March 2017 12:02

On Sunday, March 12, the region will undergo a change of time that has an historical path.  At 2 a.m. on March 12, an hour of sleep will be lost.  While some people may complain about the sixty minutes of sleep. What these momentary complainers may forget is this loss of sleep has several forms of safety influence.  As shared by Newtown Square Fire Chief Doug Everlof, “The most important event associated with the time change is the simple suggestion to add a fresh battery to the home’s Smoke Detectors.”

The first decision this time of the year is a wonderful opportunity to make the safest choice—change the Smoke Detector to the more modern, 10-year battery powered safety watchdog.

If this is not the first choice of the time-change season, there is another safety hint.   If the existing, plastic case has “yellowed” with age, that sign of age has prompted Chief Everlof to comment, “That coloring sign of aging plastic case is another sign this detector is near the end of its protective age.”

If there is one additional sign that should help in the motivation of exchanging the older type of Smoke Detector for the newer style.  The combined cost of the older style safety watch dog type Smoke Detector and the cost of batteries over a ten-year period that is the projected life of the now ancient watch dog warning device.

“Now is the time to add safety to the home and family,” added the members of the Newtown Square Fire Company.

 

Three Important Numbers

Friday, 03 March 2017 11:04

One of the most rewarding stories shared by the local and national firefighters are the important messages of young children dialing the most import three emergency telephone number 9 1 1.   In describing the importance of having children know the how to summon help in an emergency prompted Newtown Square Fire Chief Doug Everlof to volunteer, “The use of calling 9 1 1 is a proven skill to save both life- and property in emergencies”

Many emergency service providers strongly suggest the initial first step in sharing the use of 9 1 1 is a simple way to dial the three number 9 1 1.  These three numbers are an immediate way to get help. This message should also suggest this is not a toy telephone call but a way to get help from the fire, police, and medical service helpers.

One message that has an important endorsement is telling children the use of 9 1 1 is an important way to “get help” when people might become seriously helped, if there is a fire, crimes, injuries, or sickness.  Adults might also add if a child is unsure whether to call 9 1 1, these three numbers are the best thing to do.  The skilled local staff at the Emergency Call Center are schooled in how to communicate with young callers.

There are adult lessons that help children in being safe.  Children should be taught to never play with matches or lighters.  Adults wearing bike helmets helps teach an important safety lesson for young bikers.  Everyone must buckle up with a seat belt.  Have children “teach” family members the fire lessons learned at school. This can begin with Stop Drop and Roll if anyone has a fire in their clothes. Know the address and any medical problems that might occur.

These three numbers are a simple tool in saving lives. Chief Everlof added, “Teaching 9 1 1 is a simple way to obtain help if a child sees an emergency of any kind. Remember. this message also applies to adults as well.”

 

Unit Citation

Friday, 03 March 2017 10:35

Many of the Newtown Square Fire Company activities have only the short public notice as the apparatus responds to the emergencies. From time to time, these emergencies become true tests of the training and experiences that have become earned through education and activity.

During the near midnight evening of Tuesday, November 8, the Newtown Square Fire Company was dispatched to an assist in a residential fire in the 1000 block of Cedar Knoll in neighboring Edgmont Township. In addition to full fire ground services, special building-saving activities earned for responding crews a special recognition- a Newtown Square Fire Company Unit Citation.

In the assembled activity held at the Newtown Township Board of Supervisors Meeting on Monday, February 27, the presentation of a Newtown Square Fire Company Unit Citation for the crew members was shared with the media, family, and the community.

UNIT CITATION

On November 8, 2016 at 23:43 hours, The Newtown Square Fire Company along with the Edgmont Fire Company and Rocky Run Fire Company were dispatched to 1025 Cedar Knoll in Edgmont Township for a reported dwelling fire.  The Newtown Square Fire Company arrived on scene with the Edgmont Fire Company and the Rocky Run Fire Company to find a 2-story Single Family Dwelling with heavy fire from all sides of the dwelling.  Crews stretched numerous hand lines in an attempt to save the building.  The crew members from the Newtown Square also protected an adjacent home as embers landed on the cedar shake roof of the home, lighting small fires on the roof. Crews worked throughout the night to extinguish the fire and restore equipment. Crews operated for six hours before returning to station.  The outstanding effort of the following members reflects great credit upon themselves and the Newtown Square Fire Company.

Engine 41 Crew:                                       Ladder 41 Crew:

Asst. Chief Brian McNeill                         Chief Doug Everlof

FF Joseph Certo Jr.                                FF Peter Williams

Lt. Eric Harper                                      Capt. Chris Young

Lt. Zach Conan                                     FF Will Hewes

FF Greg Amato                                     FF Vincent Mazzotta

FF Joel Certo                                        FF Joseph Bail


Fire Police:

Capt. Carl Ewing

Thomas Ford

Nathan Glazer

 

LIFE SAFETY AWARD

Tuesday, 28 February 2017 13:22

Following a long-standing tradition, the Newtown Square Fire Company has a special bond with children.  For many of the current officers and crew members of this 100-year old community service organization, their first personal memories began with a fire fighting organization visit.

They continue this bond through their own time, talent, training and community services.

At the Newtown Square home, a series of events within a local family the youngest of their three sons began to experience breathing difficulties.  The Newtown Square Fire Company, the Newtown Township Police, and the Riddle Hospital Paramedics promptly responded to this emergency.

During the February 27 Newtown Township Board of Supervisors meeting, the attendees saw a presentation of a Newtown Square Fire Company Unit Citation. The recipients were the members of the Fire Company crew, responders from the Newtown Township Police Department, and Paramedics with the Riddle Hospital.  Joining in this event was the media, family, and the community.

The local firefighters continued their bond with the young recipient by obtaining for him a personalized piece of young, firefighting response clothing.

Both the firefighters and the family look forward to this early bond continuing. This series of events may hopefully be a Fire Company recruiting memory for this young man and his two brothers.

LIFE SAFETY AWARD

On December 8, 2016 at approximately 16:12 hours, the Newtown Square Fire Company along with Riddle Paramedics and Newtown Township Police were dispatched to a Hunt Club Lane home for a 2 years of age child in respiratory arrest.  The Newtown Square Fire Company arrived on location to find Newtown Police performing rescue breathing on the young child.  The crew from Squad 41 assisted with airway management and CPR on scene.  Upon the arrival of Riddle Paramedics, the child was rushed to the Medic Unit where the child was rapidly transported tote Bryn Mawr Hospital.  Upon arrival at the hospital, the child was breathing and regained consciousness.  The child was transferred over to the staff of The Bryn Mawr Hospital where further care was provided.  This life saving award is bestowed upon the following members for their immediate actions to save this child’s life.  Their outstanding efforts displayed reflect great credit upon themselves and the Newtown Square Fire Company.

Newtown Square Fire Company
Doug Everlof
Anthony DiMauro
Matthew Brinkmann
Brian McNeill

Newtown Township Police
Sgt. Brian McNeill
Det. Sgt. John Newell
Officer Christopher Barksdale

Riddle Paramedics
Kaitlyn Gallagher
Daniel Caldwell
Eugene Smith

 

Be Sure to Complete Safety Steps Before Spring Cooking

Sunday, 19 February 2017 11:45

As the area weather ‘talkers’ begin the invitations to enjoy the possible beginning of spring weather, the Newtown Square Fire Company has issued a safety warning.  Chief Doug Everlof warns that there are simple safety steps for gas-fueled cooking devices

Even thinking about the fuel level, the first of the simple safety steps begins with a simple visual inspection as the cooking system.   This first step provides a look at the flexible tubing, the solid tubes, and any cracks or loose fittings.

Newtown Square’s fire chief has added some protective guidelines.  Everlof stressed, “The first steps in testing this gas-fuel outdoor cooking area begins with a safe testing area and with the protective aid of a cell or home-cordless phone.”

When this fuel delivery system passes the “dry” visual test, the next safety suggestion assures an additional safety test. This next trial must also be done outdoors, away from the home, car, and people.

Chief Everlof added more, “Please continue to stay away from people and property.  Use a soap and water solution (half dish washing soap and half water) and coat all containers, tubes, pipes. valves, and connections that carry the cooking gas.  Finding any bubbles, immediately turn off the gas container valve. . .. and leave that area.”

In a final test, any unusual flame patterns at any of the burners may also be an indication that there may be a partial blockage in the gas-fuel carrying pipes and plumbing.  This pattern is common when insects have used this gas-carrying pipe and tubing for seasonal home. These insects and their home residue must be removed for safe gas cooking

If the removal of the insect remains appears to be difficult, home cooks are reminded of two suggestions.  One hint is to be patient and pursue. If not successful in this task, swallow personal pride and find a specialist to clear the “plumbing” of the insect residue.

Cooking devices must be inspected from time to time to assure no new problems return.  Safety is an important ingredient in all outdoor activities “By paying attention to outdoor cooking tools, the fun of outdoor activities will continue to be a good experience,” added Chief Everlof.

 

Even This Short Month Has Dangers

Friday, 03 February 2017 17:18

Rarely does any date have as much impact as February 2.  This date has once more begun a seasonal conversation based upon Punxsutawney Phil’s shadow.  This year, the collection of television and radio weather crews have begun the 2017 discussion about the accuracy of this year’s winter projection.

One of the seasonal events that has a negative impact with a projection of a prolonged collection of cooler temperatures begins with candles and their applications.  Candles have many uses and in their applications, are events associated with emotions and festive events.  Citing an upcoming event Newtown Square Fire Chief Doug Everlof added, “Not far away is the festive February 14, Valentine’s Day.”

The local fire leader quickly added, “Never place any candle or flame anywhere near anything that can burn. This includes anything that burns. These items can include cloth decorations, curtains, or other flammable items or children and their toys.”

Firefighters also stress the importance of have candles burning in homes with pets.  Their tails, fur, and curiosity all become sources of far too many neglected fires started with contact with nearby candles.

Safety is planned and practiced.  This concept was volunteered by Fire Chief Everlof in his February discussion about the seasonal safety suggestions for February. By adding safety to this shortest of 2017’s months, homes and area families are promised the future for the rest of the year.

 

Last Minute Party Drink Items

Thursday, 02 February 2017 14:43

This coming weekend for the season’s end to professional football may pose a problem for many people at a Super Bowl Party.  Some may not be able to partake in any of the traditional party beverages. Medicines, illness, and other temporary preclusions may not permit some attendees from imbibing the usual Super Bowl Party beverages.
Because there may be many reasons that may prompt a collection of differing party beverages, the Newtown Square Fire Company has shared some tasty drinks that in no way will cause any alcoholic responses. Chief Doug Everlof noted that many beverages may also use fruit juice products. He added, “It would be wise to list any fruit juice ingredients so there are no interactions with medicines anyone is currently taking.
As a public service at this active party time of the year, the Newtown Square Fire Company has prepared a long listing of non-alcoholic beverages. The unique tastes and the inviting appearance of these drinks add to their acceptability as an alternative to alcoholic beverages. Not only do they taste great, but they also help ensure the comfort of your guests who may not drink alcohol, or as an alternative throughout the party.
The following are items that will provide multiple servings.
MOCK PINK CHAMPAGNE (1 1/2 quarts or 10 servings)
1/2 cup sugar
1 cup water
1 (6 oz.) can frozen orange juice concentrate
1 (6 oz.) can frozen grapefruit juice concentrate
1 (28 oz.) bottle chilled ginger ale
1/3 cup grenadine syrup
Early in the day, mix sugar with water in saucepan and boil 5 minutes. Cool. Add frozen juice concentrates. Refrigerate. At serving time add ginger ale and grenadine syrup. Stir lightly.
CARDINAL PUNCH (44 servings)
1 qt. cranberry juice
1 pint orange juice
2 lemons squeezed or 2 oz. lemon juice
4 qts. ginger ale
Combine juices with ice and chill. Pour into punch bowl over a block of ice and add ginger ale. Garnish glasses with mint sprig. (May add orange sherbet scoops.)
MOETTE PUNCH (8 servings)
1 cup pineapple juice
1 cup white grape juice
1-pint club soda. Sugar to taste
1-quart raspberry sherbet or ice
Add soda to fruit juices; sweeten to taste. Pour into punch bowl; add scoops of sherbet.
ORANGE CRANBERRY TODDY (8 servings)
2 cups cranberry juice cocktail
1/4 cup sugar
1 Cinnamon Stick
8 whole cloves
6 cups orange juice
2 oranges, sliced
Heat first five ingredients to boiling point. Taste and add more sugar if needed. Garnish with orange slices and add cinnamon sticks for swizzles.
FRUIT SALAD SMOOTHIE
1 cup Tropicana Pure Premium Orange Juice
1 cup plain or vanilla nonfat yogurt, soy milk or tofu
2 kiwi fruit, peeled and cut into chunks
1/2 cup fresh pineapple chunks
1 large banana, cut into chunks
1 cup strawberries, halved
1 tablespoon honey
In blender container, place all ingredients; puree until smooth and creamy. Pour into four glasses and serve garnished with additional whole fruit.
Makes 4 servings.

CREAMY RASPBERRY SIPPER
1 1/4 cups raspberries
1 1/4 cups unsweetened white grape juice
1 1/2 cups raspberry sherbet
1/4 cup water
1 tablespoon lemon juice
10 ice cubes
Fresh mint sprigs, optional
Combine raspberries and grape juice in container of an electric blender; cover and process until smooth, stopping once to scrape down sides. Strain mixture through several layers of dampened cheesecloth, reserving liquid and discarding solids.
Combine reserved liquid, sherbet, water and lemon juice in blender container; cover and process until smooth. Add ice cubes; cover and process until frothy. Serve immediately. Garnish with fresh mint sprigs, if desired.
Yields four 1-cup servings
HOT BUTTERED PINEAPPLE DRINK
1 (48 ounce) can pineapple juice
2/3 cup orange juice
2 tablespoons butter or margarine
2 teaspoons brown sugar
4 (3-inch) sticks cinnamon
Combine all ingredients in a large saucepan; bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer 20 minutes.
Remove cinnamon sticks and serve hot.
Makes 5 cups.
HOT SPICED CIDER
2 quarts cider
2 tablespoons brown sugar
1 teaspoon whole allspice
1 teaspoon whole cloves
1/4 teaspoon salt
Dash of ground nutmeg
Combine cider and spice ingredients. Bring to slow boil, cover, simmer 20 minutes.
Remove from heat and pour through strainer. Add cinnamon stick to each mug.
Makes 8 servings.
HOLIDAY COFFEE
3/4 cup ground coffee
4 cup water
1/2 cup sweetened condensed milk
Whipped cream
4 (3-inch) sticks cinnamon
4 maraschino cherries with stems
Prepare coffee according to manufacturer's directions using 3/4 cup ground coffee and 4 cups water. Stir sweetened condensed milk into coffee, and serve immediate with a dollop of whipped cream, a stick of cinnamon and a maraschino cherry.
Makes 4 1/2 cups.
WHITE HOT CHOCOLATE
3 cups half-and-half, divided
(1/4 cup and 2 3/4 cups)
2/3 cup vanilla baking chips
1 cinnamon stick
1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon almond extract
Ground cinnamon for garnishing
Place 1/4 cup cream, vanilla chips, cinnamon stick and nutmeg in saucepan. Stir over low heat until chips are melted Discard cinnamon stick. Add remaining cream. Stir until thoroughly heated. Remove from the heat, Add vanilla and almond extracts. Pour into 4 cups. Garnish with ground cinnamon.
CARAMEL MILK
Makes 2 servings.
2 cups milk
5 tablespoons packed brown sugar, divided
1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract, divided
Pour milk into microwave-safe medium glass bowl. Heat on HIGH (100% power) in microwave until hot, about 80 to 90 seconds.
Carefully pour milk into 2 mugs. Stir half of the brown sugar and vanilla extract into each mug. Serve warm.

The following recipes for non-alcoholic beverages generally are created for a single drink. Each recipe has both visual and flavor appeal.
MEXICAN SUNSET (1 serving)
1 cup chilled orange juice
1/2 jigger grenadine
Pour orange juice into tall glasses. Add grenadine and allow to settle on bottom. May be served over ice.
PINA COLADA PERFECTO (1 serving)
1 jigger crème of coconut
2 jiggers pineapple juice
1 1/2 jiggers club soda
Mix over ice
NOON ON THE EQUATOR (1 serving)
1/4 cup orange juice
1 ½ tsp grenadine syrup
1/4 cup tomato juice
1/4 tsp Worcestershire sauce
Juice of 1/4 lemon
Dash of Tabasco sauce
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
Combine all ingredients in cocktail shaker and add ice cubes.
Shake well and strain into glasses.
ALMOND JOYOUS
Serves 2.
This is a delicious drinkable rendition of the infamous Almond Joy candy bar.
1 cup light coconut milk
1 1/2 cups chocolate sorbet
2 fresh bananas, frozen and sliced
2 tablespoons grated coconut
(optional)
1 teaspoon coconut extract
3/4 teaspoon almond extract
Combine the coconut milk and sorbet in a blender. Add the bananas, coconut (if using), coconut extract, and almond extract. Blend until smooth.
* NOTE - To freeze bananas: Peel bananas and seal in a plastic bag. Freeze. When ready to use, remove from freezer and slice.
BLACK FOREST MOCHA
Serves: 1
2/3 cup hot brewed coffee
2 tablespoons HERSHEY'S® Chocolate Syrup
2 tablespoons light cream
1 tablespoon maraschino cherry juice
Whipped cream (optional)
Maraschino cherry (optional)
In large mug, stir together coffee, Hershey’s Chocolate Syrup, cream and cherry juice. Garnish with whipped cream and cherry, if desired.
Serve immediately.
BLUEBERRY BOG SPARKLER
Mix 3 cups blueberry-cranberry drink with 2 cups prepared lemonade in a large pitcher. Chill well.
Just before serving, stirring in 1 1/2 cups icy cold ginger ale.
CHEESECAKE FLOAT
4 ounces soft style cream cheese
12 ounces strawberry soda
2 scoops berry frozen yogurt or vanilla ice cream
Blend together soft-style cream cheese and strawberry pop (3 parts soda to1 part cream cheese).
Add scoops of frozen yogurt.
CHOCOLATE CARAMEL CAPPUCCINO
Makes 2 to 3 servings
1 cup hot water
3/4 cup milk
2 tablespoons Chocolate Flavor NESTLÉ® NESQUIK Syrup
3 tablespoons caramel ice cream topping
1 tablespoon TASTER'S CHOICE®
100% Pure Instant Coffee
Place water, milk, Nesquik, caramel topping and TASTER'S CHOICE in a microwave-safe pitcher. Microwave
on HIGH (100%) power for 2 to 3 minutes or until hot; stir.
Serve immediately.
CRANBERRY EGGNOG
6 eggs, separated
4 tablespoons granulated sugar
1-quart cranberry juice
2 cups heavy whipping cream
Dash of ground nutmeg
Beat egg yolks until lemon colored. Add 2 tablespoons of sugar and beat for 5 minutes more. Set aside.
Beat whites until soft peaks form. Gradually add remaining 2 tablespoons of sugar to the whites.
Beat until stiff and glossy. Fold whites into yolk mixture. Stir in
cold juice and cream. Sprinkle with nutmeg. Refrigerate.
EASY PUDDING MILK SHAKE
3 cups cold milk
1 small box instant Jell-O Pudding, any flavor
1 1/2 cups ice cream, any flavor
Pour milk into blender container.
Add pudding mix and Ice Cream; cover. Blend on high speed 30 seconds or until smooth. Pour into glasses and garnish as desired. Serve immediately.
FRESH TOMATO JUICE COCKTAIL
11 cups fresh tomatoes
3 cup chopped celery
3/4 cup chopped green bell pepper
2 bay leaves
3 tablespoons chopped onion
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
3 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
1 1/2 teaspoons horseradish
3 dashes Tabasco sauce
Cook tomatoes, celery, green pepper, bay leaves and onion for 20 minutes, then put through a sieve.
Add remaining ingredients. Chill.
GODIVA FROZEN HOT CHOCOLATE
4 cups whole milk
12 tablespoons Godiva Classic Milk Chocolate Cocoa *
2 cup heavy whipping cream
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
2 tablespoons granulated sugar
2 tablespoons milk chocolate shavings
* You can also use Dark Chocolate Truffle Cocoa or Chocolate Mocha Cocoa.

Warm the milk in a small pot over a medium flame. Stir in the cocoa and whisk constantly. Do not boil. Remove from the stove and cover with foil. Let cool for 15 minutes.
Pour the hot cocoa mixture in to ice cube trays or a metal bowl. Freeze. Remove the chocolaty mixture from the freezer and allow to soften for approximately 20 minutes.
Drop the slushy cubes or chunks into a blender. Pulse intermittently until smooth and slightly icy. You may have to add a little fresh milk to help with the process.
Immediately pour into a large glass bowl. Top with fresh whipped cream and milk chocolate shavings. Sink a straw in for everyone at your table.
Sip and enjoy!
HÄAGEN-DAZS® LEMON CHIFFON SHAKE
Source: haagen-dazs.com
1 pint (2 cups) Haagen-Dazs®
Vanilla ice cream, slightly softened*
3/4 cup skim milk
3 tablespoons frozen lemonade concentrate
In blender container, combine all ingredients. Cover; blend until smooth.
Serve immediately.
4 (3/4 cup) servings.
*Tip: To soften ice cream, put container in the refrigerator for 15 to 20 minutes or until easy to scoop.
HOT CHOCOLATE TO DIE FOR
2 to 3 ounces milk chocolate
1 teaspoon butter
1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 cup half-and-half or cream
For each cup, in a double boiler combine the chocolate, butter and vanilla extract. Stir together until completely melted and smooth. Then add the half-and-half or cream slowly, incorporating it gradually as it heats, but do not boil.
Serve over a handful of miniature marshmallows garnished with a dash of nutmeg.
HOT DR. PEPPER ®
12 ounces Dr. Pepper®
2 lemon slices
Pour the Dr. Pepper® into a saucepan. Heat until it is hot and bubbly, at exactly 170 degrees F. Place a lemon slice in the bottom of each of two mugs. Pour the Dr. Pepper® into the mugs, then serve immediately.

ITALIAN CREAM SODA
Fill a 16 ounce glass with ice and add 4 tablespoons flavored syrup (for drinks...like hazelnut or vanilla).
Fill with club soda to within 1 inch from top. Top off with whipped cream on top (optional).
LEMONADE SHAKE
1 pint vanilla ice cream, softened
1 (12 ounce) can lemon-lime soda
1/4 cup frozen lemonade concentrate
2 drops yellow food coloring (if desired)
Combine ice cream, soda and lemonade concentrate in a 1-quart container with a lid. Cover and shake until smooth. If desired, add food coloring, cover and shake again.
Makes 2 cups.
LEMONADE TEA
2 family-size tea bags
1-quart water
1 1/2 cups granulated sugar
1 (10 ounce) can frozen lemonade
2 quarts water
Bring 1 quart water to boil. Add tea bags and turn off heat. Steep tea for 10 minutes. Remove tea bags and discard. Add remaining ingredients.
Mix and refrigerate.
To serve, add 1 two-liter bottle ginger ale Serve over ice.

MARASCHINO CHERRY LEMONADE
1 cup hot water
3/4 cup granulated sugar
4 cups cold water
1/2 cup fresh lemon juice
6 ounces undrained maraschino cherries.
In a large pitcher, combine hot water and sugar; stir until sugar is dissolved. Add cold water, lemon juice and cherries with their juice; mix well.
Serve over ice.

MEXICAN COCOA
2 cups milk
3 (1-inch) cinnamon sticks
4 ounces bittersweet chocolate, broken into small pieces
2 tablespoons dark brown sugar
Ground cinnamon (optional)
Heat milk and cinnamon sticks over low heat until steaming. Do not boil. Place chocolate and sugar in warm, small bowl. Discard cinnamon sticks. Pour milk over chocolate
and sugar and let stand 1 minute. Whisk until dissolved.
Serve in mugs with a sprinkling of cinnamon, if desired.
Makes 2 servings.
MINT COW
2 tablespoons chocolate syrup
1/8 teaspoon mint or peppermint flavoring
1 cup milk
1 scoop or 1/2 cup ice cream
Mix syrup with milk and peppermint. Stir well and add ice cream.

NUTTY VANILLA MILK
2 cups milk
2 tablespoons granulated sugar
1/4 teaspoon almond extract
3/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
Pour milk into microwave-safe glass bowl and heat on HIGH (100% power) until it is hot, about 80 seconds.
Stir remaining ingredients into hot milk, and mix until thoroughly combined. Pour into mugs and serve immediately.
Makes 2 servings.
ORANGE BLISS
1 (6 ounce) can frozen orange juice concentrate
1 1/2 cup ice cold water
4 large marshmallows
1 cup vanilla ice cream
15 ice cubes
Pour into blender orange juice and water. Blend approximately 5 seconds or until mixture it liquid.
Add ice cream, marshmallows and enough ice cubes so that when they are finely crushed the mixture will be thick like a milk shake. Since ice cubes vary in size you may have to add or delete a few.
Pour into serving glasses and garnish with an orange slice or marshmallow and cherry.

ORANGE CREAM
4 cups orange juice
3 cinnamon sticks
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
1 pint vanilla ice cream
In a large saucepan, combine orange juice, cinnamon and vanilla over medium-high heat. Bring mixture to a boil, and reduce to low heat. Simmer 10 minutes. Remove cinnamon sticks. Stir in ice cream. Cook over low heat, stirring constantly, until heated through. Do not allow mixture to boil. Serve with mini marshmallows if desired.
Makes 4 to 6 servings.
PEACHY YOGURT COOLER
1/2 cup milk
1 (6 ounce) container Yoplait Original peach yogurt
1 peach, peeled and cut-up
Ground nutmeg
Place milk, yogurt and peach in the blender. Cover and blend on high speed about 30 seconds or until smooth. Sprinkle with nutmeg.
PINEAPPLE-BANANA SLUSH
1 medium-size ripe banana
1 1/2 cups pineapple juice
2 tablespoons honey
Ice cubes
Combine first 3 ingredients in container of an electric blender.
Add enough ice cubes to measure 3 cups. Blend until smooth. Serve immediately.
RUSSIAN TEA
2 cups Tang
1/2 cup instant tea
1 package powdered lemonade mix
1 1/4 cups granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
1 teaspoon cinnamon
Mix together well. Store in a covered jar, and use as you would instant tea.
STRAWBERRY-CHEESECAKE SHAKE
1 (10 ounce) package frozen
sliced strawberries, thawed
3 ounces cream cheese, softened
1 pint vanilla ice cream
1/2 cup milk
Combine all ingredients in blender container; process mixture until smooth. Serve immediately.
TIDEWATER TEA
1 quart strong tea
1 cup cherry juice
3 tablespoons lemon juice
1/4 cup orange juice
4 whole cloves
1 stick cinnamon
Simmer for about 30 minutes. Serve hot.
This makes 4 to 6 servings.
TWINKIE MALT
2 cups milk
6 Hostess Twinkies
4 Oreo cookies
3 cups vanilla ice cream
1/3 cup milk
Blend milk and Twinkies for 5 to 10 seconds. Add Oreo cookies. Blend together. Add 3 cups vanilla ice cream. Blend until smooth. Pour in milk and enjoy.
VIENNESE CHOCOLATE
4 ounces semisweet chocolate
1/3 cup granulated sugar
1/3 teaspoon salt
1 1/3 cups boiling water
4 cups scalded milk
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 cup heavy cream, whipped
Melt chocolate in top of a double boiler over hot water. Stir in sugar and salt and slowly add boiling water, blending well. Add scalded milk. Simmer the mixture for a few minutes and then beat with a whisk until frothy. Add vanilla extract.
Serve chocolate from a heated coffee pot and use demitasse cups. Add whipped cream separately.
 

Page 2 of 4

«StartPrev1234NextEnd»

Run Statistics

Run Statistics

2017 Calls
2016 Total 686
2015 Total 618
2014 Total 689
2013 Total 685
2012 Total 728
2011 Total 755
2010 Total 707
2009 Total 582
2008 Total 616
2007 Total 547

DPCalendar

loader

Latest Biddle's Corner

Changes in the Fire-Rescue World

As America’s lifestyles have changed, these new ways of work, transportation, recreation and play everyone has experienced new activities in safety, exercising, and living styles.  These changes have also fostered many forms of different training, education, and working practices for Newtown Square Fire and Rescue activities.

Newtown Square Fire Chief Doug Everlof commented the local fire and emergency services must learn from differing and various safety sources.  These lessons come from new changes in America’s lifestyle, play, recreational activities, and new hobby and work experiences.

These life- and property-protecting services must learn from differing and various safety sources.  These lessons come from firefighting history, reviews from current events, and advances of fire-science. Also, safety has come from discoveries of stranded citizens or trapped firefighters, as well as general firefighting advance.

Before: In the 1950 era, the common footwear worn by firefighters was very like the continuing and current wader boots worm by stream-wading people fishing.  The legs and feet were kept dry.  One early advance in this era of footwear and several later generations of footwear used in fires was an insert that prevented foot puncturing piercings of the sole of the boot.

Current: The modern footwear is both supportive and protective. It appearance may look like a builder type boots, but their design and construction provides both a modern form of a sturdy method of walking on various types of construction and debris as well as general safety.

Before: In that same era, the firefighting gear was more like a rain coat and with some later changes, there were vest-like inserts that helped become a warming help in after-fire, winter temperatures.

Current: Today protective outer wear used by firefighters is a very distant cousin of that used in the mid last century.  No longer is the firefighting outerwear “just like a raincoat.” Its construction is the product of modern science.  Through extensive research, both the fabric used and its weaving pattern found in ‘bunker coats,’ the name of the top, outer wear used in fighting fires, is resistant to burning.

Some modern firefighting gear also has incorporated another fabric which permits the firefighter to crawl on floors to escape from the heat and fire in a firefighting area.  This near-floor posture is used by searching firefighters as they look for stranded occupants, as well as fighting fires.

The interior of today’s firefighting gear has insulation that remains in place both summer and winter.  In the summer, this insulation helps prevent the firefighter from being over-heated in fires.

Before: Early methods of firefighting would not encourage long exposures to the smoke and combustible gases in an interior building fire.  The earliest form of purging smoke particle was done by filter-type devices.  As the firefighter breathed, his inhaled air passed through cartridges that attempted to “capture” the unwanted smoke particles.

These devices were replaced with a device that had applications in coal mine and US Navy fires. The exhaled air and its moisture were captured in rubberized containers.  This moist air aided in the generation of breathable oxygen that sustained life for the user.

Current: Larger, lighter canisters of compressed air (filtered air, not oxygen) stored in back-borne devices replaced the chemical devices. With local, air storage master bottles and their use in the easy refilling of emptied, fire ground-emptied air bottles can be refilled. This provides firefighters with better sources of potable breathable air. Firefighting history, reviews from current events, and advances of fire-science safety has come from discoveries of stranded citizens or trapped firefighters, as well as general firefighting advance.

By having available this bottled-aided, extended air source and the time spent in fire ground rehabilitation, firefighters are much safer than even a few years ago. In explaining the contents of these breathing bottles, Newtown Square’s Chief Everlof stressed, “These bottles are filled with filtered air, not oxygen as some people think.  As this air leaves the pressurized containers, this air is somewhat cooled. This is also a benefit.”

 
Easter Emergency

As many families may have been preparing for their Easter dinner, a collection of area residents had their day’s activities change.  This alteration was prompted by fire dispatch for an emergency at the SAP-America facility on West Chester Pike. The weekend area surrounding this picturesque property at 3999 West Chester Pike in Newtown Square soon became a magnet for arriving emergency providers.

The firm’s security personnel became aware of a very notable aroma within the modern, multiple story structure.  Their telephone call to the Delaware County 9 1 1 Center began responses by Delaware and Chester County apparatus and firefighters.

With the anticipation of a sizable collection of fire, EMS, and other support apparatus, the first instruction by Newtown Square Fire Chief Doug Everlof was to have all incoming apparatus enter onto the road adjacent to the SAP-America property.  This selection prevented an unnecessary buildup of fire apparatus on West Chester Pike.

Chief Everlof went to the SAP-America property and met the firm’s security personnel. Everlof then established his command force on loading area that was near the air contaminated structure.

Deputy Chief George Guyer, IV went into the structure and began assigning fire crews and overseeing the search of to specific areas of investigation. Aided by their Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA) the multiple floors were examined during this Holiday Sunday.

As the interior fire crews made their deep-interior searches, there were some concerns about both a potential loss of dependable linking of all the firefighters as well as occupying a common regional fire communications frequency.  While the structure included the three well-constructed floors, choice of localized radio channel was a wise selection.

The task of doing a thorough search was completed, yet no specific, documented source of the telltale aroma could be found in either the initially tagged data center. section of the total interior of this facility, the repeating radio system was bypassed and the mobile and crew-used portable radio began their search by a direct, on-property “only” radio arrangement.

When no source of the original aroma, Newtown Square Fire Company Chief Doug Everlof and the SAP-America security personnel abandoned the group search. The structure was returned to the local operators.